Tag Archives: dyslexia

September is the new New Year

I often feel like September is more of a ‘new year’ than January, and this year I feel it more acutely than ever.  It’s the usual ‘new’ beginnings that come with the school year starting – it’s my oldest’s last first day of Junior High, my middle child’s first first day of Junior High, the beginning of dance season (that never really ended) and the beginning of choir season, karate, basketball, piano, which with the exception of piano, means the beginning of chauffeur season for me.   Its also back to seeing my dance mom friends a bit more regularly, and getting back to curling in one short month so I can see my curling friends weekly all winter – I saw them two times from end of curling season in March until now, so believe me when I say I am looking forward to curling season!

This year feels different than most because we are starting (yet another) new chapter with Berrik.  He is headed back to school.  Unexpectedly a spot opened up in a small private school, and luckily Berrik was chosen to fill that spot.  If you have a child with learning disabilities in a classroom of 27 kids (or maybe even if you have a neurotypical child in a classroom with 27 kids) you’ll appreciate my optimism and excitement when I tell you his class this year will have 10 children with one teacher and one teacher assistant.

We had the opportunity to meet with Berrik’s teachers and tour his classroom this past week.  Apparently this is something that all kids at the school have the opportunity to do. We had a scheduled time and it was just Berrik and I in the classroom.  We had the chance to really talk about Berrik and how he learns best.  Berrik got to hear about what a typical school day will look like, he got to sit in his desk, and check out some of the classroom ‘fun stuff’.   The school OT dropped by to meet Berrik and say hi.  She spent a bit of time chatting with him.  While I was talking with her, the school principal came by the classroom.  She was wearing a dress, but she sat right down on the floor anyways to look at the machine Berrik was building with K’nex.  I had met her previously, so she didn’t even speak to me.  She was clearly there for Berrik.  Any doubts or fears I may have had disappeared.

These people really seem to get it.  They get how important it is to have parents’ input.  They get how developing a strong relationship with the child is critical to the child’s success as a student.  They definitely seem to get how important all members of the learning team are to each student and family.  They get how overwhelming this can all be for families new to the school, and mitigate that through one on one attention and time to talk. This is the first time I have prepared to send my boy off to school and am doing so with excitement and basically no apprehension.

I always feel the need to defend teachers here.  I believe almost ALL teachers and school administrators ‘get it’ in terms of all the things I mentioned above.  The difference is that the public system doesn’t allow for this to happen on the scale  that it can happen in a small private school.

As a small aside, I recently watched this Ted Talk about Dyslexia & Privilege which really resonates with me, and I have often talked about how grateful I am that we are able to access resources for Berrik that many many others would not have the means to.  I have wondered many times how I could do something about this…  But that is another blog post entirely.

So today, on the official last day of summer for the kids, I sit here feeling grateful, excited, content, and hopeful.  I look forward to this year of more firsts, more adventures and more challenges too.    Given the natural disasters around the world in this moment, the craziness of the global political climate, and the stresses that many people in my life are facing every day right now, I choose to enjoy this moment and hope for a tomorrow filled with good news.

 

Teach for Mastery, Not Test Scores

I will admit that I am a bit of a Ted Talk junkie.  Add to that a healthy respect for and frequent use of the Khan Academy learning materials and you’ll understand why I LOVE this particular Ted Talk by Sal Khan:

I recommend watching the Ted Talk – it’s 10 minutes of simple brilliance.  But the general overview is that our current education system that teaches for test scores rather than mastery is causing a multitude of issues that could be overcome with a shift in mindset.  My favourite analogy in the talk is about Math.  Kids learn math concepts from an early age.  They are tested.  Let’s say they get 75%.  That’s a good grade.  They move on.  After a few years of 75% mastery, you can imagine that the 25% gaps in knowledge will create some critical issues.  Without mastery of earlier concepts, at some point, more complex concepts will become extremely difficult, and you will start to hear kids say, “I’m just not good at math.”  You can apply this to many subjects.  If kids were expected to achieve mastery before moving on (by using technology and any number of free and easily accessible resources – thank you, world wide web!), then nearly 100% of the population would be able to read, do calculus, organic chemistry etc.  He goes on to talk also about the benefits of kids learning to seek the information they need, the perseverance, taking agency over their own learning, as critical life skills.

As a homeschooling mom of a kid who has had significant challenges learning to read, and as a result also struggled in math, I fully subscribe to this philosophy of mastery over test scores.  My first introduction to this concept, or at least the first time it was articulated to me in a way that really hit home, was in Sound Connections.  Berrik does not move on to a more complex concept until he has mastered the concept he is currently working on.  And we constantly review earlier concepts as full mastery and ability to quickly access those concepts results in faster and more successful mastery of more complex concepts.

Imagine a kid who has trouble learning to read due to a learning disability that is diagnosed in grade 3.  In a typical classroom, that kid who may now have accommodations or therapies is just starting to learn to read.  What are the chances that anyone at school will go right back to the beginning…the early reading skills that kids are exposed to in preschool, kindergarten and grade 1?  Slim.  There just isn’t time. So unless he’s in a program like Sound Connections, there are going to be some gaps that will make things more challenging down the road.

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If only all kids were given the opportunity to master all pre-reading concepts and then early reading concepts and so on and so on!  Watching my kid go from low self confidence and feeling as though he was ‘stupid’ to successfully reading, and learning to decode words, and understanding advanced sound rules (and learning that the rules are all made to be broken in the English language), and learning to spell and write stories has been an incredible journey.  Yes, I homeschool so I have time.  But it’s not the time so much as the access to resources and guidance that have allowed us to efficiently work on mastering concepts. We are playing catch up.  But if these resources and methods were implemented in all kindergartens and grade 1 classes, the foundations would be strong for all kids.

Knowing that mastery is the key has changed the way we approach everything.  This is the true beauty of homeschooling for me.  We do NOT move on until a concept is mastered.  And there is no one telling me I have to.  And not surprisingly, ensuring mastery along the way has resulted in Berrik moving more quickly (especially in math) even as concepts get more complex.  We are still unravelling the puzzle pieces of why Berrik struggles so much with reading and writing – more on vision therapy and other things later.  However, in Math, we started in September doing Grade 1 Math.  We are now working on Grade 2 Math and I expect Berrik to be ready for Grade 3 Math in September when he enters Grade 3.

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My two older daughters both do well in school.  Even so, Khan’s example rang true for both of them with regard to Math.  Lack of mastery of some concepts (like memorizing timestables, for example) took 3-4 years before it truly came back to bite them. Suddenly more advanced math concepts that require an ability to recall single digit multiplication became onerous and challenging.  I remember McKenna at one point, maybe in grade 7, realizing that knowing multiplication tables like the back of her hand was a critical skill, so she took the time (on her own time, because that is a grade 3 concept!) to memorize them.  This year in Grade 8, Math is one of her strongest subjects.

It is so very simple, and it is now scalable in the classroom like it never has been in history.  It simply requires a shift in thinking.  An example Khan talks about is hearing from teachers who started assigning the Khan Academy math videos as homework and then doing the practice in class time, instead of the typical method of lecturing and teaching concepts in class and sending kids home to practice on their own with their busy and bewildered parents.  It’s no surprise that this resulted in significantly higher success rates.  And as a parent who has spent many an hour at the table doing math with kids (in spanish no less), I would be over the moon if our homework was to watch the video instead of do the practice.  For the record, many times I had to Google translate the instructions to english and then watch a Khan Academy video to teach myself what my daughters were supposed to be practicing, and then try to help them! PAINFUL.

I think a lot of homeschoolers choose homeschooling for this ability to allow kids to learn at their own pace, and achieve mastery before moving on.  It has been life changing for us this year.

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I am going to throw in a final plug for the Khan Academy.  This website/app is FREE, and you can learn just about anything.  We are using it for math and it’s pretty fantastic.  Sal has created videos about concepts which you can watch as many times as you need to. Then you practice.  A specific number of correct answers identifies mastery.  If you struggle, there are links back to the videos right in the questions, and there are also hints to help you. If you have an account, your data is tracked and you can access and analyze your child’s (or your own) progress.  Even better, the site has been gameified which I know from my L&D world is excellent for motivation and engagement.

My engineer husband who works in the construction industry would never consider building a skyscraper on a foundation that is 80% complete, so why are we building the minds of our children on these faulty, incomplete foundations?

Executive Function – It’s not a VP luncheon!

The first time I heard the term Executive Function, I immediately envisioned the executive team where I worked attending a luncheon. Which didn’t make much sense considering I was in a conversation about Berrik.

Executive function (and self-regulation) is defined by the Center of the Developing Child at Harvard as:

…the mental processes that enable us to plan, focus attention, remember instructions, and juggle multiple tasks successfully.

This requires three key components:

  1. Working Memory
  2. Mental Flexibility
  3. Self Control

Children are not born with these skills.  They are learned, and continue to develop into early adulthood.  Many kids will pick these up through lived experiences combined with direct instruction that they will be exposed to as part of playing, school, interactions with family and friends, and just about all life experiences.  For many kids, it is relatively seamless over the developmental years.  Three and four year olds learn about turn taking and are able to grasp and apply the concept, either through learning at preschool, interactions (read: squabbles) with friends at play dates or with siblings.  As kids’ brains develop, their working memory, mental flexibility and self control, typically develop as well.  For some kids, the development of executive function isn’t quite so seamless, for a variety of different reasons.

We are working on executive function skills with Berrik all the time.  Some of the potential reasons why he hasn’t had a seamless development of these skills is likely due at least in part to receptive and expressive speech delay.  When you don’t totally understand what is being said, and you aren’t able to express yourself in those early developmental years, it’s easy to understand why a kid may not ‘intuitively’ develop these skills from play and life experiences.  It’s difficult to relate outcomes to what is going on, when  you aren’t quite sure what just happened or why.  For this reason, Berrik and I work on building his capacity with these skills.  The wonderful thing about brains and neuroplasticity is that it is possible to improve capacity in these areas, and I see the evidence in Berrik consistently.  Because of the challenges he faces with receptive and expressive speech, I assume that he will always require strategies to support his executive functioning skills.  (If I’m wrong and he catches up to his peers, then all the better, but in the mean time, he needs strategies now, so that is what we work on).

Working Memory – Berrik can be challenged to keep information in his head long enough to manipulate that information.  As a result, we work on building his capacity to do so through practice using a variety of different games and activities, as well as through modelling and practicing strategies to support this.  Things like visualization, repeating things back, taking notes or drawing pictures are all helpful.  This is something that we practice as part of all subjects (and all parts of life, actually).  It’s pretty easy to incorporate.  There is always something to ‘remember’ as we do schoolwork, so I will often help him use his strategies to keep the information in his head, and then ask questions or ask him to do something that requires him to manipulate the information in some way.  For example, if we are doing a science experiment, we will go through a few steps that we will  need to take to complete the experiment (or a portion of it).  Then I may ask him to skip a step and come back to it.  Initially we will do this using visuals, so he can physically move the skipped step and put it in the new order.  Depending on the topic (it’s easier when the material is familiar), I will have him do this only in his head, using visualization, and repeating.  As he gets good at doing this, I up the ante and add more steps, or make the manipulation more challenging.  I see this as a two-fold exercise.  First, I am helping him work his brain and develop new neural pathways.  You can read about Neuroplasticity here.  Second, I am helping him develop strategies that he can use throughout his life in the likely case that this is always a challenge for him.

Another great game for working memory is the game of ‘Memory’  (Go figure). The game is also called ‘Concentration.’   We use it with sight words (thank you Sound Connections for that idea!), and also with facts in science, social studies and we are just starting to use it in math.  In science we recently did a unit on the Earth’s water cycle.  In the Memory game, I created cards for different parts of the cycle – words on one card, pictures on the other set – and Berrik had to not only match them up, but remember where each card was as we flipped them over.  We started first with matching only, with all cards visible.  Then we moved to the actual Memory game, where all cards are face down, you flip two and find the matches.  Memory, reading practice, and learning about science all in one activity. In Math, I will use two different depictions of the same numbers (as we work with base 10 blocks), and Berrik has to identify which ones represent the same number and then match them.  I am currently building a game where the cards are addition and subtraction problems and he has to find the two that have the same answer.  The key is to make sure he is pretty strong on all the cards first, and then use them in the Memory game.  It then doubles as a working memory exercise and a review of whatever subject we are working on.  It’s quite effective, and it can be used for pretty much anything.

Mental Flexibility – This comes into play when something unpredictable or unexpected happens and Berrik needs to be able to adapt and adjust to the new situation and respond appropriately.  This is fun to work on, as it’s almost like you can see the wheels turning inside Berrik’s head as he tries to figure out how to apply old rules to new situations.  We play games and then I will switch up the rules.  This helps with working memory as well, as he now has to remember the new rules as well as apply them.  Starting simple and then scaffolding is the key.  Build on skills rather than trying to jump ahead.  For a kid who had a rough grade 1 year, confidence is something that is coming along, but still needs work.  When you develop the base skills and then build on those, you are setting up for success.  Success means confidence.  Confidence means willingness to take some risks.  Taking risks means increased learning opportunities.  It’s a process.   And when he takes some risks, we really celebrate the effort as opposed to the outcome.  Outcomes will vary throughout life – for all of us – but those of us who aren’t afraid to make the effort and take a chance will see more success in life, in my opinion.  I know this from my experience in both learning, and in people management.  It rings true over and over.

Some examples of ways to do this:  In the Snakes and Ladders game, play it the normal way and then play it where you must go up the slides and down the ladders.  Play basketball, and instead of dribbling the ball, you have to toss it up and down in the air instead (this is great for all kinds of brain and coordination work).  Or if you have enough people, only allow passing, no dribbling.  Or only shoot backwards.  Anything that changes the rules, will work.  Simon Says is another good game to play for mental flexibility, working memory AND self control.  It’s also easily adaptable for kids Berrik’s age depending on interest.  When we play, Simon will often say “kick like a ninja” or “turn into the blue power ranger” etc., as that is what Berrik is interested in.  The sillier ‘Simon’ is, the more fun Berrik has with it.  I also let him be ‘Simon’ as this is great for his planning and language skills.

Self Control – In terms of impulsiveness, Berrik is fine.  The ability to set priorities is likely behind what most 8 year olds are able to do.  We work on this every single day as we plan our days.  We will talk about what is important to get done, what we would prefer to do, and how we should set up our day to get these things accomplished.  We look at the week ahead, and the months ahead as well.  Even on individual tasks we will set priorities.  What I have found is that sometimes Berrik’s priorities will be ‘out of order’ but when I ask him to explain his rationale, he has a very rational reason (rational reason for an 8 year old!).  It occurred to me after one of his explanations that if I asked my neurotypical daughters to prioritize their day for me, I suspect theirs would be ‘out of order’ as well! Sometimes I need to be reminded that it is completely typical for kids’ priorities to not match parents.  Duh.

In the photo below, Berrik and I created this camel by looking at a photo and building it, step by step.  So much planning and prioritizing with these types of activities. And if you get it wrong, it just doesn’t work.  Berrik is actually very strong in this type of planning.  If he loses patience with the activity, I’ll just do the building and have him correct me.  I will do something wrong to let him catch me. (Full disclosure, I only ‘accidentally’ mix it up some of the time.  Often I mess it up without realizing.  This type of detailed planning is not my strength.)  Variations on the game Red Light Green Light are great for self control as well.  When we play this, I usually do bear crawls or crab walks or hopping/jumping.  When physical exertion is part of the game, it requires more concentration to listen and stay focused.

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As you can tell, we do things here with as much efficiency as possible, with the most possible gain.  It would be overwhelming if I tried to individually teach or facilitate each area that Berrik needs to work on.  Combining activities and outcomes is not only more efficient, it’s actually more effective as it almost certain to require a multisensory approach.  Additionally, it’s more similar to real life in that you don’t ever just get to use one skill in whatever tasks you’re working on from day to day.  You need to be able to access it all, at the same time, in varying levels.  What is exciting, is that I can consistently see progress in all areas, and even though I may have been focusing more on one area than another, I will see the benefit show up in unexpected places.  That application of knowledge and skills in different contexts is really the key outcome for me.  It tells me that what we are doing is working.

If you’re looking for more information on executive function, or on child development in general, the Centre for the Developing Child at Harvard site is excellent.

Labels are just labels. But what does it mean for us?

Graphic credit toClick here for reference

I am always searching for more information, more ways to teach, more literature to help me understand what Berrik faces on a day to day basis, in hopes that I can help him manage the challenges, and build on the strengths.  One of the things I find difficult is trying to explain what is going on with Berrik to family or friends, who understandably do not really get it.  And how could they?  Most days I don’t feel like I totally ‘get it’ either.  I will admit that from time to time I feel defensive; and I find myself using defensive language to explain what we are doing or what is going on with Berrik.  On good days, I don’t give a hoot what anyone thinks, as I can see the progress and the potential in my child (all my children, for that matter). On bad days, I will feel defensive and protective and incredibly annoyed by the ‘sympathetic’ comments, or what I perceive to be falsely encouraging responses from people who have asked me about how Berrik is doing.  I hate feeling defensive, mostly because I know there is nothing to ‘defend’, which invariably leads to feeling guilty, since I can intellectualize that these defensive feelings I have are likely rooted in my own doubts and fears.  But let me be clear…. I have doubts and fears about the girls as well.  I think this is a normal parenting response….I assume all parents have moments where they worry about the future for their children.   That said, the girls are thus far on a ‘typical’ trajectory, and therefore it is easier for me to visualize what the future will bring (as naive as that is considering how young they are and all the chance and deliberate occurrences that can alter one’s path, repeatedly).

I came across an internet article that fairly effectively describes Berrik’s ‘labels’, DCD and Associated Disorders.

Understanding what, is helpful.  But the meat of the situation is the ‘so what?’.  How do these comorbid conditions impact Berrik?

Where to begin?  Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) – for Berrik, this manifests the most challenges in printing.  He was a bit late learning to dress himself, zip zippers, button buttons, brush teeth, feed himself with utensils, etc.  But he has all that figured out and manages very well in that regard.  He’s a bit awkward with gross motor skills at times, but generally can function well enough.  Definitely some challenges on the playground with some kids that are super athletic and appear to be part gorilla, part cheetah for how they can run and swing around the park, but generally speaking, Berrik holds his own.

Printing legibly is very difficult for Berrik, but he has come a tremendously long way.  His printing is actually quite neat now. He strongly dislikes printing (truthfully he HATES it, but I am encouraging him not to say ‘hate’…haha).  We practice daily.  Every single day.  In any way I can find to motivate him.  We write cards to his best friends next door, or fill in the blanks on an order form for an app or website he would like to join (I print the screen where you are asked to fill out your name etc., and make him fill in the blanks on paper, and then I transfer to the screen).  Another example of a situation this morning, “Mom, can I have a banana?”  “Sure, but this is a restaurant and you have to write down your food order on a paper.”  “Sigh.  You make everything difficult.  I think you like to do that to me.”  “Yes, sweets, that’s my job.” <insert eye roll from Berrik here>.  “Fine.  I’ll write it down.  Are you happy?”  “Yep.  I feel such joy in this moment.”  <another eye roll and audible sigh>

So…when you’re slow at printing, it’s easy to imagine how that impacts everything you do in school.  Slow to write the answers on a test, even if you know the answers…  makes it tough to demonstrate your knowledge.  Slow to write a story in Language Arts… so slow that it feels pointless to even try, as you are on your first sentence when other kids are done the whole assignment.  Homeschooling makes this a lot easier as we can take all the time we want.  And if we are assessing scientific process and critical thinking, I scribe for him.  Ditto for if the focus of the lesson is on telling a story with a beginning, middle and end.  I’ve been told by some teachers not to do this as he needs to be able to print.  I disagree with this philosophy.  We are working on printing, and he has/will have the ability to print.  He may never be fast at it.  And it will likely be a non-issue in the future.  The only time I EVER use a pen these days is when I’m working with Berrik.  I type or text or voice type everything.  He will too.  But he ABSOLUTELY needs to have the ability to process information, tell stories, think critically, understand concepts etc.  So if I have to do the writing so that he can achieve these goals, then that is what I will do.  (I almost went back to rewrite that last bit, since I can see how defensive I sound…. but I decided to leave it in there for demonstration purposes…)

ADHD, LD and SLI – these impact every aspect of life.  Berrik is better with attention than he was pre-diet change etc., but he still is challenged to hold his focus for long periods of time.  This manifests in reduced ability to follow multi-step directions (also impacted by speech and language issues), because he either doesn’t hear all the directions, so has no idea what he is supposed to do after step 1 & 2, or he did hear them, but gets distracted half way through whatever is supposed to be doing and ends up doing something completely different. Add to this the fact that he doesn’t always understand the meaning of some of the words in the directions, and now he’s both confused and distracted…  Think about when someone is talking to you and you have no idea what they are talking about (say, for example, your husband is an engineer and is talking about HVAC and electrical set up in a skyscraper… that is just a random hypothetical example, of course).  It is so difficult to stay focused and engaged.  That is a big challenge for Berrik.  As soon as he no longer understands what the conversation is about, he tunes out completely.  Most of the time I can’t tell whether it’s the SLI, ADHD, or a LD that is the root cause, and most probably it is a combination of all of the above.

I am constantly on the look out for strategies to single out and/or address the issues individually to see what will improve the outcomes.  Having Berrik repeat instructions back to me as I say them helps with short term memory, and focus.  If he can tell me what he’s supposed to do by repeating my words, but still isn’t sure what to do, then I can tell it’s likely a receptive language issue.  If he’s fidgeting and not engaged with me, then I can see it’s an attention thing.  Of course it’s never so simple as being one issue vs. another.  And to be clear, it’s not like this is an issue with every thing we do all day long… it just comes up in certain situations.  (Thank goodness, because it’s exhausting).

In our math studies, the SLI causes us much grief.  With the help of the ever amazing Sound Connections people, we realized that Berrik doesn’t understand the meaning of some critical math language.  What makes it more interesting and a bigger challenge, is that he understands words in some contexts but not others and the only way to determine where the deficits are is to go through each word in many contexts to tease out the areas for improvement and then work on them, one by one.  For example.  In one activity Berrik was asked to identify a row with ‘more’ of something in it.  It was a multi step problem that likely contributed to the issue, but in that context he didn’t understand what he was supposed to do.  Once he was shown what to do, he had no problem replicating it in different contexts.  So that tells us that the issue was the understanding of the words, not the actual computation of the math skill.  But on the same day, he was able to articulate and demonstrate the concept of more in a few different ways, and this occurred quite randomly in the context of some other activities we were doing.  This was a big clue that we needed to break down every ‘math’ concept word and identify exactly what didn’t connect for him, and then work with him to make those connections.  If this had not been pointed out to me, I would have never realized what was going on.  I would have assumed he understood the concept of the term ‘more’ because he does understand it in many contexts.  More, less, most, least, except, either, neither, add, subtract, plus, minus, multiply, divide, double, triple, ahead, behind, above, below, first, second, middle, last, high, low…..  these are just a few of the words that we will work through one by one.  The beauty is that some he will have no problems with, and the more foundational words he understands, the easier future ones will be to explain, as we can use the previous words to help explain the future ones.  And through all of this experimenting, his foundational math skills are being worked on, so we are accomplishing many goals with this exercise.  This both overwhelms me and gives me such hope.  All of these foundational skills will be critical to his future, and had I not stayed home with him this year, and had my wonderful friend Barbie not mentioned Sound Connections to me, we likely would have never realized these issues existed, and maybe, we would have eventually started to believe the teachers that Berrik just isn’t that smart. (Even typing that makes me tear up.  Oh the struggles this kid has endured).  I always feel like I need to put in a caveat in defense of teachers when I am writing about Berrik.  I don’t blame teachers for thinking Berrik wasn’t very smart.  I strongly believe teachers are under resourced.  Even as his mom, spending hours every day one on one with him, I find it hard to understand what is going on at any given time.  He is progressing so well this year, but it’s because I have time to spend several hours per day one on one with him, adapting and adjusting based on his specific needs on any given day.  Teachers obviously do not have this luxury.  So if anyone interprets my blog posts as teacher blaming or shaming, you are misinterpreting.

Berrik is reading SO well these days.  Particularly in comparison to where he was 6 months ago.  He isn’t caught up to grade level, but he is progressing at a fantastic pace.  I have zero doubt about his ability to read, and I am happy to see his comprehension of what he is reading also keeping pace.  Sound Connections works on phonological awareness, and through this he is learning to spell, to print, to decode words phonologically and for meaning, and eventually he will write sentences and stories through this process.  He is at different levels in different subsections of language and literacy, so we just keep moving along in all areas working harder on some than others.  For example, he is reading at a higher level than he’s at with more advanced sound blends like ‘th ‘(loud, like in ‘they’, and whispered, like in ‘think’) or ‘sh’.  The cool thing is that as we add the sound blends, he is already able to read many of the words that use those sounds, so he is able to quickly relate the sounds to words he knows, and then from there decode other words that he doesn’t know.  Because of how well he’s reading, his sight word acquisition is rather dramatically quick…  for whatever reason, if he learns a new word in a book, he is easily able to remember it for future, so we just add it to his sight words pile.  The pile is unwieldy now, but because of the reading, he no longer needs to review the earlier words as he reads them so frequently that they are solidly in his brain storage and easily accessed.  He will still from time to time read a word from back to front – meaning he starts decoding using the last sound as the first sound in the word, or confusing ‘b’ and ‘d’, or reading ‘on’ as ‘no’ or vice versa… These are typical dyslexic things, further impacted by focus or attention issues, but he manages quite well overall.  He is getting good at self correcting when he does this, which tells me he understands that the word he is saying either isn’t a word, or just makes no sense within the context of the sentence or story.  This is huge in the world of language and literacy, learning disabilities, and speech.

Hopefully this has been helpful to those wondering exactly what the heck is going on with Berrik, and how we are working through it all.  I am learning as much as Berrik is, if not more, and as an aside, thanks to his social studies curriculum, I am getting pretty informed on some Canadian culture.  Ask me about the Inuit, or the Acadians…. or about weather patterns in Iqaluit vs. Saskatoon.  And can I just brag that Berrik saw the word Iqaluit and told me it was spelled wrong , “Because every time you write a ‘q’ you always have to write a ‘u’.”  Welcome to the multitude of exceptions in the english language my boy.  Welcome.